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EMERGENCY READINESS CHECKLIST

STEP 1: KNOW THE BASICS

____ The most important disaster issues for the area where I live.

____ The recommended life-saving responses for disasters that

could strike with little or no warning.

____ If there were an evacuation order, the recommended route from

where I live? My evacuation transportation options. The location

of the nearest emergency shelter.

____ The location of shut-off valves for my household utilities (gas,

electricity, water) and how to use them. If they take a special tool,

then it should be kept right there, ready to use.

____ Designate an out-of-area emergency contact, in case local phone

service is disrupted. Make sure my loved ones know the

emergency communications plan.

____ Make it a point to meet my neighbors, in case we need to help one

another in an emergency.

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

7

EMERGENCY READINESS CHECKLIST

STEP 2: HAVE ESSENTIAL EMERGENCY SUPPLIES READY

"Stay at Home" Emergency Kit – pull these items together for quick,

easy access in your home; have quantities to last at least 3 to 6 days.

Rotate any items with expiration or "use by" dates:

_____Drinking water (at least one gallon per person per day)

_____Food (non-perishable; ready to eat)

_____Cell phone

_____Flashlight

_____Light sticks (found in sporting goods or camping supply

departments)

_____Portable radio

_____Extra batteries

_____First aid kit

_____Waterproof matches

_____Hand-operated can opener

_____Scissors or knife

_____Supply of prescription medicines

_____Current medications list

_____Emergency contacts list

_____Cash or traveler’s checks

*Note any other items you want to include in your Emergency Kit

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

8

EMERGENCY READINESS CHECKLIST

STEP 3: HAVE ESSENTIAL EMERGENCY SUPPLIES READY

Evacuation Bag – have a backpack or bag (preferably one on rollers)

that has room for your "Stay at Home" supplies and is also ready to go

with these items:

_____Personal hygiene items (toilet paper, alcohol wipes, etc.)

_____Change of clothing

_____Compact rain slicker

_____Good pair of walking shoes

_____Extra bottle or two of water

_____Blanket or sleeping bag

_____Disposable dust masks

_____Copy of emergency contacts list

Emergency Medical Kit:

_____Two-week supply of medications in original packaging

_____Medical equipment (blood sugar monitor, blood pressure cuff,

hearing aid batteries, etc.)

_____Written information about medical treatment (copy of your

medical records from doctor, list of medication names and doses)

_____Extra eyeglasses

Additional Precautions:

_____Gas tank kept at least half full

_____Emergency supply of pet food

*Note any other items you want to include in your Evacuation Bag

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

9

Recommended Foods for Emergency Kit

Stock at Least a Three Day Supply

Beverages

• Water (1 gallon per person per day)

• Canned fruit and vegetable juices

• Milk (dry, canned, or evaporated)*

• Instant coffee or tea

• Prepackaged beverages (foil packets

and foil-lined boxes)

Breakfast

• Canned fruit and fruit juice

• Dried fruit (raisins, prunes,

apricots, etc.)

• Ready to eat cereal

• Instant oatmeal

• Breakfast and granola bars

• Crackers with jam or peanut butter

Lunch or Evening Meal

• Canned beans (good source of fiber

and complex carbohydrates)*

• Canned chicken, ham, pork, salmon,

tuna, crabmeat, shrimp (good quality

protein)*

• Canned vegetables*

• Canned soups*

• Freeze-dried foods

• MREs – meals ready to eat

(Lightweight and require little or no

preparation. Look for them at

military and camping supplies

stores.)*

Snacks

• Canned puddings*

• High protein drinks

• Canned nuts (peanuts, walnuts,

almonds)

• Fruit (canned or dried)

• Trail mix

• Comfort foods such as cookies and

candy

• Beef jerky

• Granola bars

• Peanut butter

• Dry, crisp crackers

• Travel size condiments

Other Items

• Can opener

• Scissors or knife (for packaged foods)

• Disposable plates, bowls, cups, and utensils

*Discard these items if left at room temperature for more than two hours after opening.

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

10

Food Storage Recommendations

How long can food supplies be stored?

To judge how long you can store food supplies, look for an "expiration date" or

"best if used by" date on the product. If you cannot find a date on the product,

then the general recommendation is to store food products for six months and then

replace them. It’s also a good idea to date the foods when you purchase them if the

item is not dated. Canned foods have a shelf life of at least two years from the date

of processing.

Some households find it helpful to pull food products for their regular meals from

their disaster supplies kit and replace them immediately on an ongoing basis, so the

food supplies are always fresh.

What kinds of food supplies are recommended to store in case of a disaster?

Take into account your unique needs and tastes. Familiar foods can lift morale and

give a feeling of security in times of stress. Try to include foods that you will

enjoy and that are also high in calories and nutrition.

Select foods that require no refrigeration, preparation or cooking, and little or no

water. Canned foods won’t require cooking, water or special preparation. Foods

that are compact and lightweight are easy to store and carry. Military and camping

supply stores often carry lightweight and ready-to-eat meals that require little or no

preparation.

Store supplies of non-perishable foods and water in a handy place. You need to

have these items packed and ready in case there is no time to gather food from the

kitchen when disaster strikes. Sufficient supplies to last three to six days are

recommended.

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

11

EMERGENCY READINESS CHECKLIST

STEP 4: MAKE A PERSONAL PLAN

____If I have any special needs, do I have a plan for meeting them in an

emergency?

____Mobility issues?

____Reliance on medical equipment that requires electric power?

____Incontinence supplies?

____Other:

____If I am receiving home health services, have I discussed

emergency procedures with my home health provider?

____If I live in a senior living community, am I familiar with its

emergency planning and procedures?

*Note any other personal issues to consider

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

12

Day One Menu

Breakfast

Cold Raisin Oatmeal (recipe provided)

100% orange juice, 6.75-ounce pouch

Instant coffee or tea

Snack

Applesauce, ½ cup

Peanut butter, 1 tablespoon

Graham crackers, 2 rectangles

Lunch

Speedy Southwest Chicken (recipe provided)

Peaches, canned in juice, 4 ounces

Pudding, canned, 4 ounce cup

Snack

Nutritional shake, 8 ounce can

Evening Meal

Quick & Hearty Ham Goulash (recipe provided)

Crackers, 6

Dry milk, 1/3 cup, mixed w/ 1 cup water

Snack

Mixed nuts, Ό cup

Tomato juice, 6-ounce can, low sodium

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

13

Day Two Menu

Breakfast

Whole grain, ready-to-eat, cereal, 1 cup

Milk, dry, 1/3 cup, mixed with 1 cup water

100% Orange juice, 6.75-ounce pouch

Instant coffee or tea

Snack

Granola bar

Lunch

Simple Salmon Marmalade (recipe provided)

Crackers, 6

Green beans, ½ can, drained

Applesauce, ½ cup

Snack

Peaches, canned in juice, 4-ounce

Dinner

Walnut Chicken Salad (recipe provided)

Butter beans, ½ can, drained

Milk, dry, 1/3 cup, mixed with 1 cup water

Pudding, 4-ounce cup

Snack

Tomato juice, 6-ounce can

Cheese sandwich crackers, 3

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

14

Day Three Menu

Breakfast

Whole grain cereal, ready-to-eat, 1 cup

Milk, dry, 1/3 cup mixed w/ 1 cup water

Peaches, canned in juice, 4 ounce

Instant coffee or tea

Snack

Chili, vegetarian with beans, 1/2 can

Lunch

Tuna Salad (recipe provided)

Crackers, 6

Pudding, 4-ounce cup

100% orange juice, 6.75-ounce pouch

Snack

Chocolate chip cookies, 2

Milk, dry, 1/3 cup mixed w/ 1 cup water

Evening Meal

Sweet and Spicy Spam (recipe provided)

Sweet potatoes, ½ can, drained

Cut yellow squash, ½ can, drained

Milk, dry, 1/3 cup mixed w/ 1 cup water

Snack

Applesauce, ½ cup

Graham crackers, 2 rectangles

Peanut butter, 1 tablespoon

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

15

Cold Raisin Oatmeal

Serves 2

Ingredients:

• 2 packets instant oatmeal

• 1/3 cup dry milk

• 1 cup water

• ½ cup raisins, or other dried fruit

• 2 teaspoons sugar

Directions:

Mix all ingredients and let stand for five minutes. Divide oatmeal into

two bowls, enjoy.

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

16

Speedy Southwest Chicken

Serves 2

Ingredients:

• 5 ounce can chicken breast*, drained

• 8 ½ ounce can corn, drained

• 8 ½ ounce can diced tomatoes w/ green chili (or herbs and

seasoning of your choice), drained

Directions:

Mix all ingredients, divide meal in two, enjoy.

Quick & Hearty Ham Goulash

Serves 2

Ingredients:

• 5 ounce can chunked ham*

• 8 ½ ounce can baked beans, undrained

• 8 ½ ounce can mixed peas and carrots, drained

Directions:

Mix all ingredients, divide meal in two, enjoy.

* Can be substituted with canned fish, poultry, or meat of your choice.

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

17

Easy Orange Marmalade Salmon

Serves 2

Ingredients:

• 5 ounce can salmon*, drained

• 2 tablespoons (2 packets) orange marmalade

• Dash seasoning to taste

Directions:

Mix all ingredients, divide meal in half, enjoy.

Walnut Chicken Salad

Serves 2

Ingredients:

• 5 ounce can chicken breast*, drained

• 2 tablespoons (2 packets) mayonnaise

• ½ cup chopped walnuts

• ½ cup raisins (or other dried fruit)

Directions:

Mix all ingredients, divide into two bowls, enjoy.

* Can be substituted with canned fish, poultry, or meat of your choice.

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

18

Tuna Salad

Serves 2

Ingredients:

• 5 ounce can tuna*, drained

• 2 tablespoons (2 packets) mayonnaise

• 1 tablespoon (2 packets) relish

Directions:

Mix all ingredients and divide into two bowls.

Sweet and Spicy Spam

Serves 2

Ingredients:

• 2 single serving packets Spam* (3 oz each)

• 2 tablespoons (2 packets) apple jelly

• 1 teaspoon (1 packet) spicy brown mustard

Directions:

Mix all ingredients and divide into two bowls.

* Can be substituted with canned fish, poultry, or meat of your choice.

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

19

Community Service/Volunteer Activity

Looking for a way to help your community prepare for an emergency? Consider putting together

a three-day emergency food supply for seniors in your area. The second page of this handout is a

grocery list of the foods needed for the three-day menus discussed in this lesson. In addition this

list provides the cost of preparing a three-day emergency food supply for two people.

Most of these food items can be found at local grocers including Kroger, Ingles, and Publix, as

well as at departments stores such as Super Wal-Mart. Many single serving or travel size items

can be purchased from local dollar stores or ordered online at www.minimus.biz. Meals-readyto-

eat (MRE) can be purchased from military or camping supply stores. MREs cost about $7

each and provide one day’s supply of food (about 2,000 calories). Storage tubs and bags as well

as disposable plates, bowls, cups, utensils and other kitchen items can be found at local dollar

stores, grocers, and department stores.

May 2006, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602

Sara Hendrix, BS, Jennifer Walker, BS, Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, 706-542-4838,

http://noahnet.myweb.uga.edu/

20

Food item Amount Cost $

Whole grain cereal 16 ounce box 1.89

Instant oatmeal 2 packets 0.32

100% Juice 6 pouches (6.75 ounces each) 2.21

Instant coffee 4 ounce jar 1.99

Nutritional shake 2 cans (8 ounces each) 1.62

Raisins 4 boxes (1.5 ounces each) 1.13

Mixed nuts 2 bags (1 ounce each) 1.00

Peaches 6 pack (4 ounce cans) 1.89

Dry milk 9.6 ounce box 1.99

Applesauce 6 pack (4 ounce cups) 1.34

Peanut butter 18 ounce jar 1.00

Graham crackers 1 box (16 ounces) 1.67

Vegetarian chili 15 ounce can 0.88

Spam, single serving pouch 2 pouches (3 ounces each) 1.94

Chicken breast, canned 2 cans (5 ounces each) 2.38

Chunked ham, canned 5 ounce can 1.69

Tuna, canned 5 ounce can 0.52

Salmon, canned 5 ounce can 1.39

Whole kernel corn, canned 8.5 ounce can 0.44

Diced tomatoes w/ green chili, canned10 ounce can 0.82

Baked beans, canned 8.5 ounce can 0.55

Mixed peas and carrots, canned 8.5 ounce can 0.44

Orange marmalade 2 single serving packets 0.30

No-salt herb seasoning 2.5 ounce container 1.59

Mayonnaise 4 single serving packets 0.64

Walnuts 1/2 cup bag 1.19

Relish 2 single serving packets 0.46

Apple jelly 2 single serving packets 0.32

Crackers, dry, crisp 1 pound box 1.50

Green beans, canned 8.5 ounce can 0.44

Pudding 6 cups (4 ounces each) 1.37

Chocolate chip cookies 4 pack 0.69

Granola bar 2 bars 0.33

Sweet potatoes, canned 15 ounce can 0.79

Cut yellow squash, canned 15 ounce can 0.89

Butter peas, canned 15 ounce can 0.89

Vegetable juice 4 cans (6 ounces each) 1.48

Crackers with cheese filling 6 sandwich crackers (1 travel size pack) 0.26

Water 6 gallons 3.84

Total 3 Day Supply for 2 Persons 46.08